The Creation of Creationism

Wednesday, November 12, 2014

Japan makes the world's top technology - yet Europe gets the press! Why?

Why is the media shouting FIRST EVER when a bunch of European countries try to copy what Japan did a decade ago?!

Nissan rocket no. 1 with the Hayabusa robot

Nissan rocket no. 2

With a lap time of 7 min 8 sec Nissan GTR is the fastest, (non-hybrid*) globally-homologated road car around the world's most famous race track Nurburgring in Germany.

The old GTR was the first car to go under 8 minutes at Nurburgring.

* i.e. using a battery and Japanese hybrid technology to get extra power for the short time the ride lasts.

A Nissan Skyline* GTR ATESSA 4WD (2700 cc 6 cyl 280-1600 hp) from the 1990s  - the Japanese legend that Lambourghini Gallardo (5000 cc) was aimed to beat - more than a decade later! But consider huge difference in quality! The old Skyline GTR has the world record for legal cars abt 350 km/h on a German (!) autobahn (unofficial >380 km/h)!

What all GTRs have in common compared to non-Japanese super cars is superior quality. Already in the 1990s a Porsche CEO admitted that they can never achieve the same quality level as the Japanese.

* The new GTR has dropped the Skyline name. However, the basics are the same: 4WD and a small but powerful 6 cylinder engine.

Friday, April 5, 2013

Where's the star and where were you?

The illusion of a Universe

A ten billion year old supernova has been discovered. It means it died ten billion years ago, i.e. 5.5 billion years before our Sun was born.

The black area on the pic above corresponds to the white area on Klevius' Origin of Universe pic.

The nearest star, Proxima Centauri, is 4.2 light years from the Earth. Light travels at a speed corresponding to 7.5 laps around the Earth in one second.

The light from the farthest objects detectable by Hubble and other cameras (incl. radio waves etc), i.e. more than 13 billion years ago, marks the end of our capabilities, not the end of Universe. Because there is no "end" or "beginning". These terms are oxymorons and semantically absurd.

So next time you take a look at the stars do consider what you don't see.

Monday, January 9, 2012

The ridiculous idea about "one god" hampers CERN/LHC

Universe doesn't have limits - nor is it endless

In my book Demand for Resources (Resursbegär1992:21-22) I pointed out not only the dangers of such a senseless "model" as "Big Bang" but also how this "model" is trapped in a "monotheistic" view demanding "creation", i.e. a "starting point". Not only is such a "starting point" conceptually impossible (apart from its very obvious other limitations, e.g. how do you "bang" in "nothing") but it also fatally misdirects research focus because it assumes "a universe" or "the universe" where there's only universe.

A time trip back towards the "Big Bang" would only reveal a continuing growth of neighboring "universes". The space/time continuum and warping would make the "Big Bang" model laughable.

To my surprise I've noticed how many decently minded people seem to have great difficulties understanding how the great distances and the great limitations caused by the speed of light constant, warps every effort to take even quite small thought steps, say for example only within our own tiny galaxy. 

Cameras never lie - pictures do!

All space cameras, from our own eyes to the Hubble space telescope and its follow-ups, have in common that they don't take pictures of space but of themselves, i.e. photo reactions on the retina, CCD etc. These reactions are then interpreted by our knowledge. However, to describe such reactions as a picture of space is extremely misleading.

Sunday, September 11, 2011

Origin(s) of Universe

Universe as a language trap

Due to our human shortcomings we tend to entangle us with stupid concepts which then get a life of their own. These include not only e.g. irrational numbers but also such peculiarities as 'beginning', 'creation', 'existence', 'god' etc.

There can't be 'the', 'a', 'one' or 'many' in front of universe.

To understand this simple fact you just need to expore it by pinpointing the histories of light perceptions hitting "your world". Such light phenomenons may represent a "distance"* of everything from light traveling at 300,000 km/sec some fractions of a second to Billions of years. Moreover, some of them may be just side by side and with equal relative luminance. With this in mind then start it all over again, i.e. your theoretical mapping of "the Universe".

* If the source has moved or vanished when you perceive its light, then there i no real "distance" to be measured.

to be continued...

Some conventional views later to be commented by Klevius:

In astronomy and cosmology, dark matter is matter that is inferred to exist from gravitational effects on visible matter and gravitational lensing of background radiation, but that neither emits nor scatters light or other electromagnetic radiation (and so cannot be directly detected via optical or radio astronomy).[1] Its existence was hypothesized to account for discrepancies between calculations of the mass of galaxies, clusters of galaxies and the entire universe made through dynamical and general relativistic means, and calculations based on the mass of the visible "luminous" matter these objects contain: stars and the gas and dust of the interstellar and intergalactic medium.

According to observations of structures larger than solar systems, as well as Big Bang cosmology interpreted under the Friedmann equations and the FLRW metric, dark matter accounts for 23% of the mass-energy density of the observable universe. In comparison, ordinary matter accounts for only 4.6% of the mass-energy density of the observable universe, with the remainder being attributable to dark energy.[2][3] From these figures, dark matter constitutes 83%, (23/(23+4.6)), of the matter in the universe, whereas ordinary matter makes up only 17%.

Dark matter was postulated by Fritz Zwicky in 1934 to account for evidence of "missing mass" in the orbital velocities of galaxies in clusters. Subsequently, other observations have indicated the presence of dark matter in the universe; these observations include the rotational speeds of galaxies, gravitational lensing of background objects by galaxy clusters such as the Bullet Cluster, and the temperature distribution of hot gas in galaxies and clusters of galaxies.

Dark matter plays a central role in state-of-the-art modeling of structure formation and galaxy evolution, and has measurable effects on the anisotropies observed in the cosmic microwave background. All these lines of evidence suggest that galaxies, clusters of galaxies, and the universe as a whole contain far more matter than that which interacts with electromagnetic radiation. The largest part of dark matter, which does not interact with electromagnetic radiation, is not only "dark" but also, by definition, utterly transparent.[4]

As important as dark matter is believed to be in the cosmos, direct evidence of its existence and a concrete understanding of its nature have remained elusive. Though the theory of dark matter remains the most widely accepted theory to explain the anomalies in observed galactic rotation, some alternative theoretical approaches have been developed which broadly fall into the categories of modified gravitational laws, and quantum gravitational laws